Laura Hillenbrand Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption audiobook

Laura Hillenbrand Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption audiobook

Laura Hillenbrand Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption audiobook
Laura Hillenbrand Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption audiobook free
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The Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption audiobook revolves around the extraordinary biography of American Olympic runner Louis Zambrini (1917-2014) whose plane crashed in the Pacific Ocean after joining the military during World War II.

In the ocean, he and two colleagues spent 47 days on a lifeboat before they were found by the Japanese army, and taken to the detention camps, where they stay until the end of the war. The audiobook is from on Laura Helenbrand‘s book of the same name (Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption) and includes a biography of the famous runner, while the brothers Joel and Ethan Quinn rewrote the script. Initially, the flashback scenario returns to Zambrini’s childhood to portray his struggle to cope and prove himself, especially since he is the son of an Italian immigrant family.
His older brother, Peter, encouraged him to run and participate in races, encourage him to believe in himself, and tell him that “endurance is the criterion for success.” A sentence that comes back to Zamprini’s mind every time he is about to surrender, and it is repeated throughout the movie as if it were an amazing discovery despite its simplicity. The main questions that Angelina Jolie poses through this story may be what is made of the will, and when the endurance varies between individuals, and are there really people who will not be broken, no matter the size of the torment? This proposal, which is the starting point of the Laura Hillenbrand Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption audiobook, seems important in itself, but without Jolie actually succeeding in what remains of the work of showing the image of the human Superman represented by Zambrini through the story of his unfamiliar survivor. Later, Unbroken addresses the efforts of the American runner and his two colleagues to survive in the midst of the ocean, within a framework that is not without black comedies, as it appeared when the poor Nawras bird who landed on the boat was caught for eating raw, or fighting hands with sharks. Also, the dialogues are characterized by their simplicity, which avoids dramatic exaggeration, but it seems pale, lacks the dramatic passion required in some scenes, and sometimes approaches naivety in its simplification of situations.
About 47 days after the lifeboat, the Japanese find Zambrini and his two colleagues barely alive, while their third colleague is dead. Zambrini is imprisoned in a detention camp in Tokyo, where he enjoys the torture of the leader of the “Bird” camp who, from the outset, he says, monitors the strength of the Zambrini figure, whom he considers similar to.
Later, the Unbroken audiobook focuses on the conflict between Zambrini and Bird. This conflict is depicted in a caricature, specifically in terms of the maniacal Japanese leader who almost aims only to destroy the heroic runner. He practiced all kinds of torture on him, and when he failed to subject him, he eventually cried in a scene intended to be the height of the drama, but it actually came closer to the comedian.
The conflict between Byrd and Zambrini may have an implicit sexual dimension, as the preoccupation of the first with the second seems to be a projection of homosexual inclinations. And his desire to kill him is to eliminate these tendencies. If this approach is intended, then it is interesting, although the way in which the Laura Hillenbrand book depicts Japan in general is more similar to satire and cartoony. British actor Jack O’Connell plays Zambrini, and he was most famous for his brilliant performance in “71” by Lien Domongue. Unbroken succeeds in portraying the character of the steel man whose design appears to be simple and stripped of ego considerations. Zambrini is not a superhero in his own eyes; “I am nothing,” the latter says to his brother in one of the scenes of the beginning, and he answers that he always has to make a double effort to catch up with others, while his hardness seems to stem from his constant readiness to receive blows and pain.

 

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