Patrick Rothfuss – The Name of The Wind Audiobook

Patrick Rothfuss – The Name of The Wind Audiobook

The Name of The Wind Audiobook – By Patrick Rothfuss

 

 

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The Name of the Wind is one of my favorite books, a crush as I have rarely had. I’m writing this review after a proofreading that was just as enjoyable to me as the first one. I was once again carried away by the story of Kvothe and I confirm that this book is definitely one of the best that I have had in my hands.

 

We meet Chronicler, young scribe and renowned biographer, who is saved from the attack of a terrifying arachnid creature by the innkeeper of a small remote and lost village. But Chronicler is not fooled by the apparent banality of the innkeeper who says his name is Kote, especially since he made the trip on purpose for him. This is Kvothe, famous arcanist, legendary musician and king slayer. Columnist wants his story at all costs, even if it must cost him three days of his overbooked life as a famous biographer, although usually a day is enough for someone as young as Kvothe, even if he had things to do and even if he has to endure the disturbing presence of Bast, the strange friend and apprentice of Kvothe …

 

Kvothe then launches into the story of his life, beginning with his youth in the troupe of the best traveling actors which are before telling about his entry at the University where he will learn the very scientific magic of sympathism, credible, palpable magic, which one almost has the impression of being able to practice us too. But do not be fooled, we are far from a beautiful story of witchcraft, the story of Kvothe is tragic and his life is based on the drama that will touch him when he is only a child … discovers that the young Kvothe has only two ideas in mind. The first is to learn more about the Chandrians, these mysterious croquemitaines from legends and who have become simple children’s tales for all to see … And Kvothe wants to learn the Name of the Wind. The real magic, the magic of Names, that of Taborlin the Great.

 

If you know me a little, you will have noticed that I often repeat how much I hate perfect heroes. Yet here, Kvothe is pretty much the best at everything he does, and he knows it. His unbearable arrogance is forgiven by the fact that he is right and that it often falls across his face, but I let you discover for yourself how we make enemies at the University. But above all, the character of Kvothe takes on its full meaning in its parallel with Kote, the insignificant, almost depressing innkeeper. Despite his apparent perfection, we know even before the story begins that Kvothe will end up on his own in this remote inn. And we are dying to know why.

 

Patrick Rothfuss created a whole new mythology and cult, as well as exciting legends told by different protagonists as the story unfolded. the mystery which surrounds the Chandrians, the Amyrs, Landre and Telhu is very thick and dark and Kvothe has a lot of courage to try to disentangle the true from the false … If I’m dying to wait to have the end in my hands, I’m also dying of fear!

 

I would add a few words about the place accorded to music in Kvothe’s history. Whatever your relationship with music, you will be touched by the place it occupies in the hero’s life. The Eolian scene took my breath away and made me cry twice, and I was moved as rarely I have been by the relationship between Kvothe and his lute. It might sound silly like that, but trust me, it will give you chills.

 

I don’t want to reveal too much in order to leave you the pleasure of the discovery, so I would just say a last little word about the characters of the saga, which are all very particular and very well worked. You will meet a lot of women, and all of them will be beautiful and strong (the palm in Devi, which I like very much) You will dream of having certain characters as a friend or as a teacher and you will be very happy that others are not. Many are affected by madness, whether it is mild or … not at all. Elodin and Auri will make you smile more than once. Auri will even be entitled to a short story just for her, The Slow Regard of Silent Thing, which comes out in original version at the end of the year … and which I am looking forward to.

 

The style is very good, fluid, poetic – no, musical, Kvothe would take it badly for me to talk about poetry – and could have been perfect without a few translation errors that I admit not having noticed on my first reading. The second time around, phrases like “He set off again and took the path […]” bothered me a bit, but the translator is easily forgiven for these few mistakes in view of his excellent work on the whole. ‘artwork. And that’s really the only flaw I could find in the novel.

 

I can’t talk about the Name of the Wind without talking about its cover. It is absolutely perfect, in my eyes inseparable from the novel as it is in perfect harmony with the story. It is matched only by the covers of the two equally beautiful parts of the Fear of the Sage. It is signed Marc Simonetti (who launched a crossfunding for the release of his artbook and I strongly encourage you to participate)

 

I recommend Patrick Rothfuss – The Name of The Wind Audiobook l to everyone, even to you who hate fantasy, because it will make you change your mind. ‘notice. I forbid you not to love him. It’s my absolute favorite, and it was only recently dethroned by the second part of its sequel, La Peur du Sage, which has pushed the limits of perfection. Get started!

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